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HAKUBA

Click on ski resorts for detailed information and maps
ski resorts map

Skiing & Snowboarding

All mountains allow skiing and snowboarding on all slopes.

Night Skiing
Night skiing is available at four of the resorts in Hakuba, usually from the end of December to the end of March. Courses are fairly limited in Hakuba compared to Niseko, the latter offering superb night skiing in the world's largest night skiing area.

Lifts
There are 7 ski resorts in the Hakuba valley and 3 interlinked resorts in Niseko. All resorts operate a main Gondola lift that is fully enclosed, seating between 6 and 10 people, providing access to the main slopes. Express quad lifts are also common, and provide fast access to runs. Double chairs are widely utilised, especially for providing access to the more advanced slopes. Most resorts are operating new and modern lift facilities, supported by professional grooming and snowmaking services.

Lift Tickets
All of the ski resorts in the Hakuba Valley and Niseko use an electronic lift pass system. The pass is a re-programmable computer chip encased in a small plastic covering. Placed into customer's ski clothing or gloves, it allows guests to pass through the electronic gates at each lift. When a lift pass is purchased, or a lift exchange pass redeemed, a 1000 yen deposit is required. The 1000 yen is refunded when the pass is put into an automatic exchange machine located near the ticket selling booths.

Ski Rentals and Ski Lessons
Most hotels have a limited stock of mid range ski and snowboard rental equipment. For the latest range of performance equipment and full range of sizes the specialist ski rentals shops offer a far superior service. The largest ski and snowboard boot sizes available in Japan for rental are 32cm or US 13.

English language ski and snowboard instruction can be organized for customers. Lessons that are taught in English must be pre-booked as private lessons. Group lessons are also available but are not given in English, they are only taught in Japanese.

On Mountain
Restaurants
There are ample rest stations on the mountains where food can be purchased, although it is mostly of the fast-food variety. Meals such as fried rice, noodles, and curry are well priced, and are usually large and filling. Beer and other alcoholic beverages are widely available.